Reconstruction
By Nigel Green
Text by Martin Kew Meade
Publication March 2010
128 pages
24,5 x 20 cm
ISBN 978-2-9530799-6-8
Diaphane editions
25 euros
Purchase info@diaphane.org

The post-war architecture of Picardy

The post-war architectural landscape of Picardy is distinct and inescapable.
Suffering devastation in both first and second world wars the enormous task
of reconstruction encompassed every form of built structure: agricultural,
civic, domestic and religious. Entire towns and villages were rebuilt from
scratch creating a uniquely 20th century architectural environment.

While post-war reconstruction architecture reflects the necessity of
recovery and replacement combined with the possibilities of modernization,
the most interesting aspect of this process was the development of unique
and hybrid architectural forms. The term vernacular modernism would
perhaps be the best way to describe the incorporation of a range of styles
and materials. Art Deco, modernism, functionalism, constructivism and
industrial forms can all be found interwoven with the existing vernacular.

It is my hope that the photographs I have taken reflect something of this
diversity and in the book I have grouped the images into categories, to show
the variations of design that exist within each type. Equally it is important
to stress that I have not concentrated on the grand public buildings, or
those considered to be exceptional, but have rather sought to celebrate
the ordinary and quotidian. It is fascinating to consider how radical ideas
in architecture and urbanism become interpreted and manifested in local
forms.

Contact: Nigel@nigelgreen.info

Reconstruction
By Nigel Green
Text by Martin Kew Meade
Publication March 2010
128 pages
24,5 x 20 cm
ISBN 978-2-9530799-6-8
Diaphane editions
25 euros
Purchase info@diaphane.org

The post-war architecture of Picardy

The post-war architectural landscape of Picardy is distinct and inescapable.
Suffering devastation in both first and second world wars the enormous task
of reconstruction encompassed every form of built structure: agricultural,
civic, domestic and religious. Entire towns and villages were rebuilt from
scratch creating a uniquely 20th century architectural environment.

While post-war reconstruction architecture reflects the necessity of
recovery and replacement combined with the possibilities of modernization,
the most interesting aspect of this process was the development of unique
and hybrid architectural forms. The term vernacular modernism would
perhaps be the best way to describe the incorporation of a range of styles
and materials. Art Deco, modernism, functionalism, constructivism and
industrial forms can all be found interwoven with the existing vernacular.

It is my hope that the photographs I have taken reflect something of this
diversity and in the book I have grouped the images into categories, to show
the variations of design that exist within each type. Equally it is important
to stress that I have not concentrated on the grand public buildings, or
those considered to be exceptional, but have rather sought to celebrate
the ordinary and quotidian. It is fascinating to consider how radical ideas
in architecture and urbanism become interpreted and manifested in local
forms.

Contact: Nigel@nigelgreen.info